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Upcoming Seminars

Monday, July 17, 2017
Overview of Metal Additive Manufacturing Research Activities for RF Applications at the Center for Additive Manufacturing and Logistics (CAMAL)
Tinothy Horn - Norht Carolina State University


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Advanced Instrumentation Seminars (AIS) cover topics of interest to the broad commnunity of experimenters at SLAC. Invited speakers represent all facets of technology related to SLAC research.  more »

Next Seminar:

Overview of Metal Additive Manufacturing Research Activities for RF Applications at the Center for Additive Manufacturing and Logistics (CAMAL)

Tinothy Horn - Norht Carolina State University

speaker

Monday, July 17, 2017

1:30 PM

Kavli Building 3rd Floor Conference Room

View Poster (PDF)

Abstract:

Metal Additive manufacturing (AM) is rapidly changing the way in which we design and manufacture many critical products, from custom, patient specific prosthetics to production scale jet engine components to replacement parts for legacy systems. Recently, there has been growing interest in the use of additive manufacturing for the fabrication of components for the fabrication of novel radio frequency (RF) structures using copper, copper alloys, niobium, and other refractory materials. Additive manufacturing provides several advantages over conventional fabrication technologies such as fabricate monolithic, geometrically complex, 3D structures in a single operation, eliminating manufacturing tooling and numerous assembly components, as well as, improving thermal management for high power devices geometrically optimized conformal cooling channels without sacrificing vacuum integrity. The key challenges faced when considering AM for RF structures are process parameters, porosity, chemistry, and surface roughness. Research at CAMAL on electron beam melting (EBM) of OFE copper led to the development of high duty cycle, high brightness NCRF photo-injectors, and Niobium SRF components. CAMAL is currently funded by the U.S. Department of Defense, The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), and the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop AM technology for S, W, L and X-Band RF DEVICES, specifically, wave guides, traveling wave tubes and klystron cavities.

Speaker's Biography:

Dr. Timothy J. Horn: Timothy Horn is a Research Assistant Professor in the Fitts Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering at NCSU. He is also the Director of Research for NCSUís Center of Additive Manufacturing and Logistics (CAMAL) at NCSU. CAMAL is one of the leading international centers for metal additive manufacturing, and under Dr. Hornís direction has developed new AM systems and applications pertaining to Electron Beam Melting (EBM) and Laser Melting. In particular, CAMAL has significantly modified its hardware and control systems to facilitate new materials, alloy development, enhanced instrumentation, process monitoring and control. Dr. Horn and his team have developed process parameters for the additive manufacturing of many materials and alloy systems, including Titanium Alloys, Aluminum Alloys (e.g. 6061, 7075, 2024), GrCOP84, OFE Cu, Titanium Aluminide, Nickel Superalloys (e.g. 718, 625, waspalloy, M247, etc.), RRR Niobium and Niobium alloy C103, several bulk metallic glasses (Fe and Zr based), and rare earth magnetic materials such as FeNdB.