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SARS

Update on SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome)

SARS is an illness with respiratory symptoms (coughing and shortness of breath) with a high fever (above 100.4°F or 38°C), which can progress to a severe generalized illness.

For information about SARS and the most recent news and updates, we recommend the following websites:

  • World Health Organization, SARS
  • Center for Disease Control, SARS
  • Travel Advisory

Occupational Health Center has evaluated this international situation, focusing on SLAC and our personnel and our work. Our recommendations based on this evaluation are below. Please check this page periodically for any updates. We will continue to follow the SARS situation as it develops.

Updated as of May 12, 2003

SLAC Travelers:

  • All SLAC staff are advised to limit Laboratory foreign travel as much as possible, especially to those areas where SARS outbreaks have been identified.
  • All staff are also encouraged to limit their personal foreign travel for the same reason.
  • Information about which countries/areas have been involved in disease outbreaks changes, but these countries currently include Hong Kong, Vietnam, Indonesia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, portions of China and Toronto, Canada.
  • SLAC international travelers who have traveled (or who are currently traveling and reading this remotely) to one of the areas where a SARS outbreak has been identified or who may have been exposed to SARS should be vigilant for fever and respiratory symptoms. If these symptoms are observed, staff should use infectious control precautions to minimize the potential for transmission to others and are strongly urged to contact their personal physician for evaluation and medical care, whether or not they have recently been on foreign travel.
  • If SARS symptoms are confirmed, SLAC staff should limit their interaction outside the home and should not go to work or public areas until 10 days after the resolution of fever and symptoms.
  • SLAC employees should check the SLAC Occupational Health Center Web site for updates.
  • Persons who may have been exposed to SARS should be managed as per recommendations from CDC.


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