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What to Do in an Emergency?

Earthquake

Preparation

  • Brace and secure all furniture in your office and home.  Here at SLAC, you can place a maintenance request at Facilities (CEF) to have this done.
  • Place large or heavy objects on lower shelves. Fasten shelves, mirrors, and large picture frames to walls. Brace high and top-heavy objects.
  • Store any breakable items (glass, ceramics, etc.) on low shelves or in cabinets that fasten shut.
  • Locate safe spots in each room under a sturdy table or against an inside wall.
  • Participate in SLAC's regular earthquake drills in your building and know your evacuation routes.  Talk to your Building Manager for details.  At home, hold periodical drills with your family.

During an Earthquake

Minimize your movements during an earthquake to a few steps to a nearby safe place. Stay indoors until the shaking has stopped and you are sure exiting is safe.

If you are Then:
Indoors Take cover under a sturdy desk, table, or bench or against an inside wall, and hold on. If there isn’t a table or desk near you, cover your face and head with your arms and crouch in an inside corner of the building.

Stay away from glass, windows, outside doors and walls, and anything that could fall, such as lighting fixtures or furniture.

Stay inside until shaking stops and it is safe to go outside. Most injuries during earthquakes occur when people are hit by falling objects when entering into or exiting from buildings.

Be aware that the electricity may go out or the sprinkler systems or fire alarms may turn on.
Outdoors Stay there.

Move away from buildings, streetlights, and utility wires.  At SLAC, go to the nearest evacuation staging area.
In a moving vehicle Stop as quickly as safety permits and stay in the vehicle. Avoid stopping near or under buildings, trees, overpasses, and utility wires.

Proceed cautiously once the earthquake has stopped, watching for road and bridge damage.

After an Earthquake

  • Be prepared for aftershocks. These secondary shockwaves are usually less violent than the main quake but can be strong enough to do additional damage to weakened structures.
  • Open cabinets cautiously. Beware of objects that can fall off shelves.
  • Stay away from damaged areas unless your assistance has been specifically requested by police, fire, or relief organizations.

For more information on Earthquake Safety at SLAC, please contact the Fire Marshal, Ralph Kerwin.

(Safety information adapted from the FEMA website "Are You Ready")

 


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